About
Work is more complex than ever before, and our productivity isn't keeping up.
"Normal" use of email often means a constant influx of messages and the expectation of a quick response for each. The result is fragmented attention and the exhaustion that comes from extreme multitasking. Increased collaboration is a key goal in every workplace, but stress and time pressure militate against our ability to listen, be patient, and be open to others' ideas. In addition, the bias for action in most organizations forces us to rely on automatic, reactive thinking instead of deep, creative reflection from which we could learn more effectively. The result is a plethora of distracted minds, scattered attention, and anxiety. Even if we're coping, the effort and personal cost is great. We need to get our heads above water.

What's the alternative?

Mindfulness.

The need for an alternative to the way we live and work is clear. There is a growing interest in mindfulness that is loudly echoed in the scientific and popular press. Companies have invested in it to support the wellbeing of employees, and leading institutions in business education – at Stanford, Harvard Business School, and IMD (Lausanne) – have made a commitment to mindfulness in their programs.

We have an innate capacity for mindfulness. It is nothing foreign that we have to learn – it is rather something that we cultivate and bring forth. Being mindful allows us to recognize and understand things that a restless, inatentive mind might miss altogether. Mindfulness is the basis for all higher cognitive abilities, including concentration. This ability to maintain undivided internal and external awareness of what is happening in each moment is a fundamental leadership skill. The results of such mindfulness skills are clearer decision-making, more efficient time management, increased self-knowledge, and an improved ability to access intuitive wisdom. Every aspect of our lives – family, work, health, education, recreation, art – can be positively influenced by mindfulness practice.

"The benefits of mindfulness include better performance, heightened creativity, deeper self-awareness, and increased charisma - not to mention greater peace of mind."

- Harvard Business Review

Sophie Maclaren
At Oxford, Sophie directs Saïd Business School's Mindfulness in Business certificate programme for MBA students, and is a trainer for the Skoll Centre's Leading for Impact social leadership programme for Oxford graduate students. Also, she is a trainer and consultant at Kalapa Leadership Academy.
For over ten years Sophie has worked with emerging and established leaders as a mindfulness trainer, consultant, and coach. In this capacity she has created hundreds of custom programmes, partnered with thousands of individuals and groups across the globe, and founded several organisations/ initiatives to develop the next generation of mindfulness trainers and support young leaders in 30+ countries.

Sophie specialises in mindfulness for high-impact individuals in leadership roles, and brings attention and care to each individual as they craft their own mindfulness practice. She teaches special topics on mindfulness in working life/business, mindfulness for students and emerging leaders, and the mindful organisation. Sophie is particularly excited to continue engaging change agents, allowing mindfulness to become a practical tool for enhancing human-centered professional life while increasing social impact.

At Oxford, Sophie directs Saïd Business School's Mindfulness in Business certificate programme for MBA students, and is a trainer for the Skoll Centre's Leading for Impact social leadership programme for Oxford graduate students. Also, she is a trainer and consultant at Kalapa Leadership Academy.
Agenda
March 19th / Monday
19.00 – 19.50
What is mindfulness and how does the mind work?
19:50-20:00
Q/A with the participants


20:00 – 20:30
Mindfulness practice
Expected outcomes
Improved attention
Participants experience a clear improvement in executive control, a measure of one's ability to devote att ention and concentrate when and where they want. As a result, participants are bett er able to focus on purpose, on the task at hand, and avoid time- and energy-consuming distraction.
Lower stress and perceived workload
The experience of having too much work produces stress. Participants report lower perceived workload demands and experiencing fewer worries, less tension, and greater happiness while at work. Mindfulness helps participants see more clearly,
which cuts anxiety about imagined outcomes.
Improved productivity and concentration.
Participants consistently report that they are more productive and bett er able to concentrate, fostering a positive feedback loop for eff ort and activity.
Improved decision making quality and creativity
Participants report an increase in the range of possibilities they perceive in making decisions and generating fresh ideas. While this may be att ributed to a variety of sources, innovation and adaptability in the face of change are key factors of success in fast-changing markets and industries.
March 19th / Monday
Smart.Point, 1st floor, Impact Hub.
Bayzakov str., 280
This location has a parking lot (in front of "Shafran" restaurant).
CONTACT US:
Arailym Ashirbekova arailym.bagdat@gmail.com
+7 747 901 3410 globalshapers.ala@gmail.com
Event was supported by:
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